Wednesday, January 16, 2008

A Righty Superhero With the Power of Free Speech

Funny that I was coming to post this when I read Qhorin's post. This guy, Ezra Levant, has become a conservative hero.

Quick review, he re-printed the anti-Islamic, or whatever you want to call them, Danish cartoons in a Canadian conservative rag. Specifically two Muslims were offended and asked the Canadian Human Rights Commission to force him to apologize. Well he isn't going to and he is posting his case, full of established law and comments about 1984, for the world to see. Interesting real life stuff.

He videotaped the whole interview/'interrogation', his words, and put it up on YouTube. It is 90 minutes total but has some great one liners. Obviously this is all from his perspective so you will have to find 'balance' on your own if you want that. But check out this post where he points out the hyprocracy of his foe and then refrains from being a hypocrate himself where he says, "Let me be clear:"

Here is a taste of the mission this guy has put himself on:

2 comments:

Gus said...

It's a bummer that freedom of speech issues (particular in the Danish cartoon instance) have to go hand in hand with retardo bigotry. But yeah, the guy is a bad ass for standing up. The biggest failing of the liberal/Democrat movement is their constant siding with censorship.

Muslims Against Sharia said...

Islamofascist-Dhimmi Axis Assault on Free Speech

Muslims Against Sharia are proud to be the first Muslim group to publicly support Ezra Levant and denounce HRC inquisition.

Proceedings against Ezra Levant are nothing short of ridiculous. HRC legitimizes radicals' claims that Islam cannot be criticized and Freedom of Speech only applies to radical Muslims.

But Ezra Levant is not alone. The latest casualties of Islamofascist-Dhimmi Axis Assault on Free Speech include Dr. Rachel Ehrenfeld, Fouad al-Farhan, Joe Kaufman, and Mark Steyn. Are you going to be next? http://muslimsagainstsharia.blogspot.com/2008/01/islamofascist-dhimmi-axis-assault-on.html

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